04 May 2021

Full Council meeting: April 27th 2021

 You might find the following of interest?


  • Animal Management Plan for Endorsement: this caused some debate as a clause included a trial of on-leash dogs at Unley Oval was suggested. After three deputations and a long debate the controversial clause was excluded from the motion.  
  •  KWR/ Greenhill Rd  Bikeway: The option accepted was the one that best separated cars from bikes.
  • Annual Business Plan for Public Consultation: This suggested a rate rise of 2.25%. Unley balances the increase in your house's value with the desired rate increase. To do this the rate in the dollar is lowered to get the rise desired. Your rate only go up in excess of this if your house value has increased to a greater extent than others. This usually happens after you have renovated or extended your house.
  • Commuter Parking: This motion asked council staff to look for further opportunities to limit commuter parking.
  • Strategic Property Committee Minutes (CONFIDENTIAL)
  • Edmund Ave Cottages Lease (CONFIDENTIAL)
  • Brown Hill Creek Land Acquisition (CONFIDENTIAL)

Clarence Park Community Centre

 Feedback week is coming!

Tell us what you think??

Monday, 10 May—Thursday, 13 May 2021

10am—1pm

Join Centre Coordinator Joanna Di Ciocco for a chat on how Clarence Park Community Centre is meeting your needs and wants. Drop in to the House Next Door and share your suggestions, ideas on how we can make our Centre even better.

CLARENCE PARK COMMUNITY CENTRE—THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR  72-74 East Ave Black Forest

Not available to pop in but have something to say?

Complete a feedback form, or contact the Coordinator direct by phoning 8293 8166 or             email: jdiciocco@unley.sa.gov.au

 

 

As a thank you

23 April 2021

When did rubbish become resource recovery?

 



I was bemused at the title Unley’s new Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan. It seems that last time we looked at this in was a roadside collection plan. I can remember clearly as a child what we did with our rubbish. My father dug a deep hole just outside the fenced house block and all rubbish went in the hole: we lived in the middle of nowhere. When it was filled he dug a new one. When we had finished eating or drinking anything in the car the waste simply went out the window, being careful that the container was empty and the passenger behind had their window up.  With the introduction of 10c for each container this practice soon stopped. Then followed the single household bin; we had little kids and a big garden needed two and paid for the extra one. We taught the kids how to sort the stuff that could be recycled and they took great pleasure in getting it neatly in the black box supplied by Council. That is until they saw the same pick up truck empty the carefully sorted recyclables  into the same truck as the other rubbish and lost all interest. Then came a separate bin for the green stuff and we were able to manage with one other bin. Then the council provided us with three bins and nothing much has changed except which stuff goes in what bin?  In the early 2000’s the  hard waste that people had was collected by Council on an annual basis but some people thought they could also dump as they pleased whatever they had no use for. Council went all out with Crime Scene tape and letters to residents which has mostly stopped this practice.  With education, free green kitchen caddies and good data collection we now see more food waste going into the green bins. This practice, is however, problematic for people in apartments as they often do not have access to a green bin. The green waste is all recycled to become compost: a resource recovered. The contents of the recycling bin is also recovered. That leaves only the little blue bin that goes to landfill. It is this that Council has to pay to dump at ever increasing prices. We rarely have much in our bin these days and ideas like reducing how often this bin is emptied are tempting as a rate saver. The contractors are currently paid on the number of properties they pass but the new plan suggests they might be paid on the actual number of bins lifted. Given all of this its time to see our waste in a new light; remember the old adage one man’s trash might be Council’s treasure.

15 April 2021

THE SHED @ CLARENCE PARK COMMUNITY CENTRE

 THE SHED @ CLARENCE PARK


THE SHED @ CLARENCE PARK COMMUNITY CENTRE

 

Support your Community!

Support your Local Shed!

 

We are Open

Tuesdays 9am-12noon & Thursdays 9am-3pm

 

  • New volunteers welcome (women & men)
  • An interest in woodworking is preferable but not essential
  • Membership $20/quarter
  • Items are  lovingly made or repaired using re-cycled timbers
  • Items for sale (some up-cycled)
  • New wooden toys and other items are made and sold (including cutting boards, cheese boards & rolling pins)
  • Bird nesting boxes can be made to order
  • Made to order items can be discussed

12 April 2021

Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan Consultation


 


Consultation has just commenced and will be open until 10th May 2021 on our Your Say Unley website for our two environmental plans:

 

Two ‘drop-in’ sessions have been scheduled and will be held on Earth Day where we will welcome people to come and speak to staff in person.

Thursday 22 April at either Goodwood Library (10am-1pm) or Unley Library (5-8pm).

 

Electronic copies of both Draft Plans are on the Your Say pages, but also available directly here:

Draft Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan

Draft Climate and Energy Plan

 

We are seeking comments to ascertain support for the proposed key directions and to provide our community with an opportunity to make improvements for consideration in Council’s adoption of Final Plans.  

 

02 April 2021

Cultural Plan ready for your comment


 


The new Cultural Plan can be found here. It is ready for your comment. What do you love or hate about it?



29 March 2021

Australia Day: published in the East Adelaide Herald last week.





It has been said that the date of this event/celebration should be changed to a more suitable date. Also that it isn’t the business of Council and that it should be left to other levels of government to do the research, to consult widely and make the final decision.

Nevertheless, l asked my Year 10 History class, as part of their studies on Human Rights what they thought as an assessment task. Everyone of them was able to articulate that the current day of Jan 26th was no longer suitable. They were then asked to research and then choose another date. So what did they choose?

Jan 1st : Federation: the day that Australia became a nation.

Feb 13th Kevin Rudd’s Apology for past government policy that allowed discriminative policy.

March 2nd: The Australia Act was passed that dropped all legal ties with the UK.

March 12th: Canberra named as Australia’s capital city.

April 11th: Abolishment of the White Australia Act.

May 26th : Sorry Day, an acknowledgment of mistreatment of Aboriginal people.

May 8th : Mates day with no other significant event.

June 3rd: Abolition of Terra Nullius through a High Court decision (Mabo v Queensland).

June 11th Racial Discrimination Act passed.

It is fair to say that each person was passionate about their choice and that there was no consensus from the group. They were also able to explain that we need a date that is inclusive of all Australians: not just Aboriginal people and those descended from Europeans but also immigrants of other races and different faiths. And hence the date chosen reflects this.

I agree, this isn’t the business of Local Government, but it is the business of everyone of us to work toward a suitable alternate date that celebrates the Australian nation we have become. A date that offends no-one and celebrates a turning point in our history whatever that may be?